Armchair Empire Home

 

Platform: PC

Genre: Role-Playing

Publisher: TBA

Developer: Silver Style Entertainment

ETA: Q1 2004

 

Related Links:

Review: Harbinger (PC)

Review: Icewind Dale II (PC)

Review: Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic (Xbox)

 

 

 

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The Fall: Last Days of Gaia

 

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Post apocalyptic worlds are nothing new in gaming, or any other story telling medium of recent years.  The planet has been hit by one horrible disaster or another, and things are decidedly grim with gun-toting mercenaries walking around like 29th Century samurai, ramshackle sheet metal hovels littering the landscape, and the mandatory contingent of mutant freaks spreading fear in a heavily-armed leper sort of way.  Now Silver Style is taking a stab at making a game with a similar sort of sensibility all tucked in a role-playing shell for the PC.

 

So how did Earth get decimated in The Fall to create this post apocalyptic world?  Easy, terrorists.  What happened was that NASA was preparing to send the first terraforming mission to Mars, but a terrorist group got a hold of it just as it was set to leave for the red planet, holding Earth hostage as they threatened to pump lethal amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere, killing every human on the planet.  Eventually the CO2 was pumped, though no 

one knows if it was started by the terrorists or by a technical failure.  Whatever the case entirely to much CO2 got in the Earth’s atmosphere and it caused the planet’s temperatures to rise considerable, most vegetation to die, and much of the water to be contaminated with little hope for the situation to improve in anything less than several centuries.  Now players must do their part to maintain order in this far from friendly world.

 

A maximum of six members will be allowed in a party at a time as players wander through this decidedly non-linear RPG outing.  For those of you interested in collecting tons of weapons, you’re 

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in luck as there will be a selection eclipsing the 300 mark in The Fall.  A few interesting new features will also be included in the game, such as digging for water as well as the ability to hunt and gut animals.

 

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Features:

 

- Innovative 3D role-playing game illustrates a haunting, non-linear story of epic dimensions

- Simulation of a complete post-catastrophe world with realistic character behavior, plausible flora and fauna as well as a stirring end-time atmosphere.

- Up to six party members, each with their own characteristics, interact with the other members.

- Day- and night-cycle effects plus lifelike daily routines for every single NPC enhance realism.

- Novel fight system for real-time and turn-based battles and countless tactical options develop replay value.

- New possibilities of interaction with the environment such as digging for water, hunting and gutting animals bring unexpected experiences to the genre.

- More than 300 different weapons, armor and other items provide extensive freedom in combat.

- Players have direct control of vehicles like pick-ups or buggies.

Intuitive game control and menu-driven user interface make for easy pick-up-and-play.

- Free-roaming zoomable camera allows many different perspectives, from ISO to 3rd person.

- Three difficulty levels from beginner to hardcore appeal to gamers of all backgrounds.

Stunning 3D sound and speech for all in-game texts bring the deep storyline to life.

 

Making a game set in a post apocalyptic world is never an easy task, necessitating a wary mind to avoid all the clichés of the sub-genre lurking out there.  Hopefully when The Fall is finished it will prove to be an interesting addition to one’s role-playing library, not a title that looks like it was made by people who watched too much Mad Max growing up.

 

Mr. Nash

October 25, 2003