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Platform

DS

 

Genre

Puzzle

 

Publisher

Beuna Vista

 

Developer

Q Entertainment

 

ESRB

E (Everyone)

 

Released

February 20, 2007

 

 

- Action puzzles are so much more intense

- "Disney" setting should appeal immediately to kids

- Another Meteos is not a bad thing

 

 

- "Disney Magic" is a bit of a misnomer since the properties are never fully exploited

 

 

Review: Meteos (DS)

Review: Konductra (DS)

Review: Tetris DS (DS)

 

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Meteos: Disney Magic

Score: 7.5 / 10

 

Meteos: Disney Magic makes absolutely no secret about where it cribs its gameplay from – it’s in the title after all.  As an action/puzzle game Meteos’s singular gameplay goal was to line up horizontal and vertical lines while only being able to manipulate the tiles in a vertical fashion; matching them up would send the whole thing rocketing skyward.  If the play area filled up, it was game over.  Meteos: Disney Magic tweaks the general gameplay by 90degrees – you play it on its side – and allows you to slide the tiles horizontally as well as vertically which makes the game “easier.”

 

meteos disney magic          meteos disney magic

 

It’s tons of fun – and if it weren’t for the squandering of the Disney license I’d have no qualms recommending Meteos: Disney Magic to any fan of action puzzles.

 

“Squander” is a strong word but it fits here.

 

The story mode throws you through a series of challenges set in different Disney films, like Cinderella, Toy Story, Winnie the Pooh, Tim Burton’s Nightmare Before

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Christmas, and Lilo & Stitch.  The challenges change but the main gameplay conceit – of lining up like tiles to send them skyward to “clear” them from the stage – doesn’t change.  There are time limits, opponents to ‘bury” and specific tiles to clear out, but the rapid gameplay still prevails.  With all these stages set in recognizable Disney 

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films it’s a shame that more wasn’t done to really make use of the license.  The music is a big, big letdown.  Though the tunes are variations on their specific themes, none of them are arrangements taken directly from the films.  Some of Diseny’s arrangements are Academy Award winners yet they aren’t included, why?  It’s not as though licensing is a problem.

 

With wi-fi multiplayer to back-up the generally intense single-player modes, it’s still a good purchase for action puzzle fans.  Or more specifically, the kids of those action puzzle fans.

 

- Omni

(March 26, 2007)

 

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