PC | 3DS, DS, PSP | Wii | PlayStation 3 | Xbox 360 | Retired: GBA | GameCube |PlayStation 2| Xbox |

News | Reviews | Previews | Features | Classics | Goodies | Anime | YouTube



only search AE

 

Platform

Playstation 3

 

Genre

Action

 

Publisher

SCEA

 

Developer

Naughty Dog

 

ESRB

T (Teen)

 

Released

November 1, 2011

 

 

- There simply isn’t a better franchise on any system that has such a stellar, well-written script along with magnificent voice-acting performances that transcends the usual cinematic-heavy gaming experience and becomes the nearly unequalled definition of what an “interactive movie” truly is

 

 

- As spectacular as the story and voice-acting is, some elements don’t work well within the balance of stellar storytelling/strong third-person action gameplay (most glaringly the lost-in-the-desert chapter)

- While the multiplayer has a lot to like with good maps, weapons, upgrading features and modes to select from, the uneven aiming/shooting – especially on the lower ranks – can be very frustrating
- Puzzle hint/solving assistance is very welcome, particularly since the puzzle challenges –unevenly spread throughout the game are often needlessly confusing

 

 

Review: Uncharted 2: Among Thieves (PS3)

Review: Batman: Arkham City (360)

Review: Gears of War 3 (360)

Review: God of War III (PS3)

Review: Indiana Jones and the Emperor's Tomb (PC)

 

Newsletter

Be notified of site updates. Sign-up for the Newsletter sent out twice weekly.

Enter E-Mail Address Below:


Subscribe | Unsubscribe

Uncharted 3: Drake's Deception

Score: 9.5 / 10

 

drake's deception          uncharted 3

 

Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception for the PS3 is without question a Holy Grail of gaming that a scant few before it have ever come close to achieving: rising above simply being a videogame and transforming into true interactive movie. As in the first two Uncharted adventures before it, the third entry in the franchise gives gamers a treasured rarity of having a highly cinematic story, excellent voice-acting, solid third-person gameplay and high-quality sound, music and graphics to forge an enjoyably unforgettable experience like few other videogames ever have. Coming closest to this quality was Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception’s likely competition for

Advertisement

 


 

- Playstation 3 Game Reviews

- Action Game Reviews

- Games Published by Sony

2011 Game of the Year honors throughout the industry: Batman Arkham City – along possibly with a few recent Rockstar entries in Red Dead Redemption and Grand Theft Auto IV.

But none can compare to Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception in having all elements firing on high-quality cylinders. And quality all begins with the story. Uncharted’s franchise has excelled

Advertisement

at having Hollywood-quality scripts from the very start, and of course Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception is no exception to that. In the third installment of Sony’s cornerstone PS3 franchise, once again full of mysticism, magic and ensuing mayhem, gamers get to see how Victor Sullivan and Nathan Drake first met, 20 years prior, as gamers take control of a teen Nathan, already exhibiting his treasure-seeking propensities. Flashing forward to the current-day Sullivan-Drake alliance, both – with the help of Chloe, Elena and Charlie – fight and race against Talbot and his band of secretive agents hired by one of the series’ best villains ever, Katherine Marlowe.

Both groups are each searching for the apparent real “fortune” of Sir Francis Drake, as detailed by famous writer T.S. Lawrence, whose death is intimated to have been caused for his knowledge of the “secret”: the dark secret buried deep inside the “Atlantis of the Sand” in the deadly Rub’ al Khal desert. The fantastic story travels from London to Columbia to Yemen, with plenty of twists and turns along the way. Amazingly and expertly crafted, the script detailing an adventurous tale with great dialogue and is voice-acted to perfection. It features hidden gems like the shocking revelation about Nathan Drake via the villainous Marlowe – that “Nathan Drake” is indeed truly not actually his real identity! Gamers never find out what this all means in the grand scope of the so-far trilogy’s arcing storyline, because she isn’t exactly going to be appearing in any future sequels after her sand-trap experience. With subtle yet remarkable touches such as this (as well as an as-usual assortment of laugh-out-loud comedic dialogue lines), many Hollywood movies would be jealous of both the script and acting performances present in Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception.

However, while Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception has few peers among 2011’s releases on any console, there are quite a few not-so-great aspects. As spectacular as the story, voice-acting, gameplay and visuals are, some elements don’t work well within the balance of stellar storytelling/strong third-person action gameplay. Most glaringly, the lost-in-the-desert chapter, that immediately follows the action-packed fight aboard the cargo plane that has now crashed into the middle of the desert. Still retaining the quality storytelling, it falls flat in the sand as far as gameplay is concerned. Gamers literally do not much else except point Nathan Drake in a particular direction, and agonizingly watch him stumble heat-stroked slowly across the desert. No enemies to fight off, not obstacles to avoid, just a slow march across the scorching sands.

 

uncharted 3          uncharted 3

 

Another similar totally unnecessary “gameplay” waste of time is when Nathan Drake, under the effects of the hallucinogenic influence of the dart needled into his neck by Talbot, trippingly runs through the marketplace. No actual gameplay involved, just running through the tight corridors suffering from a wobbly, drug-induced stupor for no gameplay-functional reason. Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception also has a very lackluster puzzle quality. The puzzle hint/solving assistance is very welcome, though, as the game will actually reveal the solution to a particularly troublesome puzzle if gamers get stuck. Unfortunately, that’s seemingly because the puzzle challenges –unevenly spread throughout the game are often needlessly confusing.

There is a lot to like about the multiplayer aspect of Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception. With good maps, weapons, upgrading features and modes to select from, including a great co-op adventure mode, the multiplayer gaming choices are strong. However, uneven aiming/shooting – especially on the lower ranks – can be very frustrating. On the early rankings, without the accuracy boost, trying to shoot/kill a opposing gamer can be extremely hard, especially if they’re darting around every which way. It’s not as good as Battlefield or Call of Duty or Sony’s own Resistance 3 multiplayer, but franchise fans should still enjoy the online features once they master the aiming/shooting functionality.

While certainly not a “perfect 10” gaming experience due to some uneven puzzle and gameplay sections and a good-but-not-great multiplayer, Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception is a marvellous mixture of world-class storytelling, gold-standard voice-acting, adventurous gameplay, beautiful visuals and audibly arousing orchestral music and sound effects. Others have come close before (and Batman Arkham City is as close as it gets), but as one of the two or three best games of 2011, Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception defines what an interactive movie gaming adventure truly is and solidifies its place as the best PS3 franchise ever produced.

- Lee Cieniawa
lcieniawa@armchairempire.com

(November 30, 2011)
 

Digg this Article!  | del.icio.us 

Advertise | Site Map | Staff | RSS Feed           Web Hosting Provided By: Hosting 4 Less

Affiliates:

 - CivFanatics-   - Coffee, Bacon, Flapjacks! -    - Creative Uncut -      - DarkZero -     - Dreamstation.cc -   

 - gamrReview-     - Gaming Target-    - I Heart Dragon Quest -    - New Game Network -

- The Propoganda Machine -    - PS3 : Playstation Universe -     - Zelda Dungeon - 

All articles ©2000 - 2014 The Armchair Empire.

All game and anime imagery is the property of their respective owners.

Privacy Statement - Disclaimer